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Station #33:  Entertainers traveled Japan's roads alongside government officials long before pilgrimages became fashionable and civilians took to the highways in the late 18th century.  This group of three female musicains are carrying their shamisens, a three-stringed instrument that could be played in many different  styles.  It was frequently used as an accompaniment to chanted legends and for Noh and kabuki plays.  Geisha played shamisen in the highest class tea houses.  Some styles were banned by the government as being too sensual.\n\nImage Copyright: Minneapolis Institute of Art
Copyright © 2007, Helen and Steve Rindsberg

Station #33: Entertainers traveled Japan's roads alongside government officials long before pilgrimages became fashionable and civilians took to the highways in the late 18th century. This group of three female musicains are carrying their shamisens, a three-stringed instrument that could be played in many different styles. It was frequently used as an accompaniment to chanted legends and for Noh and kabuki plays. Geisha played shamisen in the highest class tea houses. Some styles were banned by the government as being too sensual.

Image Copyright: Minneapolis Institute of Art